Dalton Assault Case

Rotherham Town Hall (Formerly Rotherham Magistrates Court) - 13.07.17

Rotherham Magistrates Court

Rodger Ogden, born in 1909 in Rotherham, is my third cousin, twice removed and son of Albert Edward Ogden and Elizabeth Surtees. Rodger’s siblings, Alice, Martha and Clarice, are also featured on this website.

In 1933, Rodger married Nellie Davies, in Rotherham and together they issued two children.

Below is a newspaper article regarding a feud that Nellie had with her neighbour.

THE ADVERTISER, SAT., OCT. 2nd, 1954

“Feud” Hint In Dalton Assault Case

When two Dalton housewives appeared at the Rotherham West Riding Court on Monday on summonses for assault, the suggestion was made that there had been “more or less a feud” between the parties concerned.

Nellie Ogden (42), of 23, Norwood Street, Dalton, was charged with assaulting and occasioning bodily harm to Alice Cawthra (46), of 14, Parva Cottages, Dalton. Mrs. Cawthra was cross-summonsed by Mrs. Ogden for assault.

Mrs. Ogden was fined £3, with 3s. costs, and bound over in the sum of £10 to keep the peace for 12 months. The cross-summons against Mrs. Cawthra was dismissed.

Chief Insp. L. Farmer, B.E.M., said that at 2 p.m. on Friday, August 27th, Mrs. Cawthra was washing the steps leading to the back door of her mother’s house, 25, Norwood Street, Dalton. Mrs. Ogden was in the doorway of her house, 23 Norwood Street, which was next door but one. Mrs. Cawthra had almost finished cleaning the last step when Mrs. Ogden shouted out in a sneering manner “Don’t forget your gate step.”

There had been some previous argument about the gate step, explained the chief inspector. Mrs. Cawthra replied that she didn’t want any bother. Mrs. Ogden, however rushed across and got hold of Mrs. Cawthra’s hair, struck her repeatedly and knocked her head against a wall.

A witness, Mrs. B. Sanderson, of 14, Norwood Street, Dalton, intervened and pulled the accused away. Then Mrs. Cawthra went into the house.

When Mrs. Cawthra later reported the assault to the police, went on the chief inspector, she was in a very distressed condition. The front of her pinafore was covered with blood and she had cuts and abrasions on her face, and two lumps on her head.

Two constables interviewed Mrs. Ogden at her home that day and she made the following statement “She asked for it; she had been skitting and I let her have one. It must have been my ring that did it. I didn’t know she was that easy. She is always gossiping about me. If she had come off best it would have been all right.”

“SOME TROUBLE”

Mrs. Cawthra said she was in the habit of cleaning her mother’s steps. There had been some trouble about the particular gate in question. Mr. M. W. Field (representing Ogden), to Mrs. Cawthra: There has been a lot of trouble over all sorts of things in the past, hasn’t there? – Not with me there hasn’t.

Your mother and you have been having more or less a feud with the Ogdens. You are not on very good terms with them are you? – No.

Were you not making faces at Mrs. Ogden? – No, I wasn’t.

Mrs. Cawthra denied having rolled up her sleeves and asked Mrs. Ogden to “come over,” and said Mr. Ogden had urged his wife on to make the assault. Mrs. Cawthra also denied kicking the accused, or touching her in any way.

Beatrice Mary Sanderson said she saw Mrs. Ogden go over and attack Mrs. Cawthra, and had tried to part them.

“Mr. Ogden shoved me off and told his wife to get back at her. Then he shoved me out of the yard,” said witness.

When it was suggested that Mrs. Cawthra’s mother, Mrs. Green, had tried to pick up a bucket, then a brush, to come to her daughter’s aid, Mr. Field said Mr. Ogden had to restrain her.

In reply to a question by Col. J. W. B. Landon (chairman) it was stated that Mrs. Green was 71.

Ogden said that Mrs. Cawthra and her mother had been falling out with her husband all morning.

Mr. Field submitted it was just an unfortunate disagreement between neighbours that happened form time to time. it was always difficult in these matters, he said, to decide who started things.

Finding Ogden guilty, and dismissing her cross-summons, Col, Landon said: “Presumably she only brought proceedings after receiving the summons for assault. It was a barefaced assault.”

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